Book Review

Anglerberger, Tom:

I am still reading books by Tom from our library.  I’m down to just the last two books by him.

The Surprise Attack of Jabba the Puppett (Origami Yoda 4)

They didn’t have #3 at the library, so I skipped right to #4.  This one is named for Jabba, but he doesn’t actually show up until the end of the book.  I’m not giving away who the person is behind Jabba the Puppet, but it ends up helping the children out.  The children have lost their extra curricular activities, and they have to go to extra classes that prepare them for the end of year testing.  The children not only don’t like the classes, they think the classes are making them dumber.  They all join up together and everyone, not just Dwight, has finger puppets.  The kids all form their own Origami Rebel Alliance and decide to find a way to stop the extra study class and bring back their extracurriculars.  This book ends with the principal agreeing to talk to the school board and try to come up with a solution to their issue, but nothing is decided or fixed for the kids.

Princess Labelmaker to the Rescue! (Origami Yoda 5)

This one picks up right where the other left off, except this time the case file has been stolen by someone (it’s not revealed until the end, so I don’t want to spoil it), and that person gives the journal to the principal.  The principal ends up helping the children and working with them to convince the school board that the extra classes are hurting them and they shouldn’t have to take them.  This entire series seemed to be one big fight against standardized testing.  I hate those tests, and I don’t think they tell us anything about how our schools are doing.  The children spend most of the year learning that things that will be on the tests instead of learning to explore and learn things on their own.  They aren’t ever allowed to follow an idea or a passion for something and see where it ends up or what happens because those things won’t be on the mandatory testing, so they can’t spend time studying those things or learning about them and seeing where they take them.  Overall, these books are great, and I’m sure the number of fans that he has speaks for themselves, but if you haven’t heard of them and you have an elementary/middle schooler, I think they would love these!!

The Rat with the Human Face: The Qwikpick Papers

There are at least 3 Qwikpick Paper books, and this is the second one.  It’s about 3 friends who hang out at the Qwikpick convenient store in their town.  The kids are from very different backgrounds, but they are friends and they have formed a society for adventure.  They hear someone talking about seeing a rat with a human face, and they decide they need to investigate.  Their parents are clueless and don’t seem to care what they do, or care too much about how they behave without finding out who their children really are.  I think this is a theme in the books from him that I’ve read so far.  I know that the ways these parents behave is definitely not the way I would react or treat any of my kids.  Anyway, this book was good and it kind of left me on a cliff-hanger where the club is concerned, and i want to know what’s going to happen.

Clarkson, Sally:

The Lifegiving Home Experience: A 12-Month Guided Journey

I started this book in January, and i have read one chapter each month.  This kind of walks you through each month with ways to be present with your family, how to create traditions with your kids, and how to show hospitality to those around you in each month.  I have read another of her books, and she seems to make her life almost an unattainable goal, and I have to remind myself that I don’t have the same personality that she does, and understand that everything at her house is probably not as perfect as it seems at first glance.  Overall, it was a great book… it’s short, but I stretched it out so I could concentrate on each month this year as it came.  I really enjoyed it.

Hartley – Brewer, Elizabeth:

Raising Happy Kids: Over 100 Tips For Parents And Teachers

I’m not sure I would say that I loved this book.  I liked it, and I thought it had some good things in it, but it’s just like any other parenting book to me.  It had a lot of examples of real people, which I liked, but it also had unrealistic ways of talking to your children, in my opinion.  I wouldn’t ever say things the way she encouraged us to talk.  We just don’t communicate in that formal way.  There are some aspects that I will remember and use, but overall it is pretty much the same as any parenting book I’ve read.

Smith, Angie:

What Women Fear: Walking in Faith that Transforms:
I got this book as part of an online study with my friend who lived in Turkey the same time we did.  I ended up not being able to participate in the study because I wasn’t able to get online every week, but I loved the book and the facebook discussion.  This book really made me think about the things that I fear and how I can do better at letting go of those things and not letting them take over my life.  This book is great for individual reading, but it is also great for small group discussions.  I recommend this for anyone also, not just women.

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